UPDATED: MBTA Names Ester Chief Safety Officer

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The following is a press release from MBTA

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BOSTON – The MBTA today, August 4, announced the appointment of Ronald L. Ester Jr. as Chief Safety Officer. Ester’s transit career spans more than twenty-eight years at the Chicago Transit Authority where he held executive positions including Chief Safety and Security Officer, Vice President – Rail Operations and Capital Projects Oversight, and Vice President – Rail Operations/Communication-Power Control. 

“Safety for our customers and our employees is a core value at the T,” said MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak. “Ron has walked in the shoes of both the Chief Safety Officer and transit operations. This unique blend of experience will serve the MBTA well and help us deliver a best-in-class safety program.”

The salary is $240,000 annually.

The Chief Safety Officer is responsible for strategic policy development, management, and oversight of safety programs – including construction safety and operational safety. The Chief Safety Officer ensures that a safety culture exists in all decision-making to guarantee the safety of riders, employees, and contractors.

“Ron Ester is a recognized public transit leader and is coming to Boston to share his expertise with the MBTA,” said FMCB Chairman Joseph Aiello. “Ron will bring to the T his knowledge of transit safety and accountability, and will work diligently to address the issues identified in last year’s Safety Panel Report.”

Ester is the recipient of the USDOT Transit Safety Institute’s Transit Safety and Security Program Certification. This certification indicates that the individual has a broad-based knowledge of the safety and security principles applicable to transit system safety, operations, and management. Ester also serves as an industry expert providing peer review for the American Public Transit Association (APTA).

The MBTA is Building a Better T by undertaking an ambitious $8 billion modernization effort to maintain stations, replace subway fleets, upgrade tracks, signals and switches; reinvent its bus system to reflect changing demographics; and replace its fare collection system to make the T a better, safer, and more reliable transit system.

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